New screening for ovarian cancer

New screening for ovarian cancer

Megan Mullins, Feature writer

A new blood test may cut cancer deaths by a fifth. Researchers and independent experts have been conducting a 14 year study on 200,000 woman in order to test for ovarian cancer. It is difficult to pick up ovarian cancer in the early stages as the symptoms are very common and even everyday problems. Nathan Jones a sophomore at Michigan City High School said “ I think that what they are going to lower ovarian cancer rates by a fifth is great. It could one day possibly Save the lives of hundreds even one of my loved ones or family members.”
But they test is not proven effective enough to call for a mass screening. BBC news source Usha Menon UCL told BBC “We do not have clear evidence to go ahead with screening, but what we have are really encouraging estimates of around 20% reduction, which we need to confirm.”
The tests are estimated to take approximately another 3 years, until the researchers are able to work out the issues associated with the screening. One issue that is notable is women having unnecessary surgeries in order to remove benign growths. BBC source Dr. Adam Shaw the clinical lead for cancer genetics at Guy’s and St Thomas told BBC “ very encouraging but there is still more work to do. Nonetheless this study is a landmark step in devising effective screening for ovarian cancer, which is often portrayed as a silent killer.”

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